MassQC Help > Metrics > Chromatography > Peak Width Variability          
Peak Width Variability

Peak Width Variability is a metric that describes the variation of peak widths throughout the Retention Spread.

Lower variability in chromatographic peak widths indicates a more stable system.

The Peak Width Variability metric is calculated by subtracting the width of a narrow peak (a peak that is narrower than 75% of the peaks) from the width of a wide peak (a peak that is wider than 75% of the peaks). For this metric only the peaks that have been matched to peptides are considered.

Units:

Seconds (s)

Optimal:

Lower: Lower variability means increased reproducibility.

What the Metric Detects:

An increase in the Peak Width Variability means that some of the LC peaks are broadening. This may indicate tailing or fronting of the peaks caused by a dirty column. A trend of increasing Peak Width Variability may mean the LC column needs to be replaced.

Related Metrics:

The Peak Width Variability metric uses the same full width at half max measurement of that the Peak Width metric does. In general an increase in the Peak Width will result in an increase in the Peak Width Variability.

Sample overloading may also increase Peak Width Variability, but will also cause the Total Ion Current and Peak Intensity metrics to increase.

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